Due date for filing your Income Tax return and payment of your Tax Due

Posted by nsglobal | General | Sunday 11 June 2017 1:07 pm

April 15. If your “tax home” or “abode” is in the United States, your filing deadline is April 15. ​

June 15. For some Americans abroad, the IRS has given an automatic extension of time to file your income tax return–to June 15.

An extension of time for filing returns of income and for paying any tax shown on the return is hereby granted to and including the fifteenth day of the sixth month following the close of the taxable year in the case of . . . United States citizens or residents whose tax homes and abodes, in a real and substantial sense, are outside the United States and Puerto Rico.

In other words, if you are a U.S. citizen or resident alien, and your “tax home” and “abode” is outside the United States and Puerto Rico, then your income tax return filing deadline is June 15.

October 15. You can get an extension of time until October 15, using the traditional method of filing Form 4868.

You must file Form 4868 in a timely manner. This means you must file it before April 15 (if your tax home and abode is in the United States) or before June 15 (if your tax home and abode is outside the United States.)

However a small clarification, if the automatic extension expires on June 15 then the Form 4868 extension continues on for another four month, expiring on October 15.

December 15. If an extension to October 15 is not enough time for you to prepare and file your income tax return, you can apply for and receive one more extension of time – to December 15.

This is done by sending a letter to the IRS.

Publication 54, Tax Guide for U.S. Citizens and Resident Aliens Abroad (2016) (PDF), at page 4, gives you the rules:

Taxpayers who are out of the country can request a discretionary 2-month additional extension of time to file their returns (to December 15 for calendar year taxpayers). To request this extension, you must send the Internal Revenue Service a letter explaining the reasons why you need the additional 2 months. Send the letter by the extended due date (October 15 for calendar year taxpayers) to the following address:

        Department of the Treasury

        Internal Revenue Service Center

        Austin, TX 73301-0045

You will not receive any notification from the Internal Revenue Service unless your request is denied.

The Form 4868 instructions defines the phrase “out of the country” as living abroad:

You’re out of the country if:

You live outside the United States and Puerto Rico and your main place of work is outside the United States and Puerto Rico[.]

The words, “out of the country” has nothing to do with where you are. It means where you live.

Thus the people who are entitled to claim the additional extension of time to December 15 are people whose tax homes and abodes are outside the United States – not people who physically happen to be inside or outside the United States on a particular day.

Due date for payment of your Tax Due

April 15. The tax due on your tax return is payable on or before April 15.

June 15. If you qualify for the June 15 extended deadline to file your tax return, you can pay your tax without late payment penalties on or before June 15. However, you will owe interest on the tax due, from April 15 until the day you pay the tax. No further extension of the payment due date is possible.

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Seven Facts about Dependents and Exemptions

Posted by Sanket Shah | General | Friday 19 May 2017 2:46 pm

There are a few tax rules that affect everyone who files a federal income tax return. This includes the rules for dependents and exemptions. The IRS has seven facts on these rules to help you file your taxes.

1. Exemptions cut income. There are two types of exemptions: personal exemptions and exemptions for dependents. You can usually deduct $3,900 for each exemption you claim on your 2013 tax return.

2. Personal exemptions. You can usually claim an exemption for yourself. If you’re married and file a joint return you can also claim one for your spouse. If you file a separate return, you can claim an exemption for your spouse only if your spouse had no gross income, is not filing a return, and was not the dependent of another taxpayer.

3. Exemptions for dependents. You can usually claim an exemption for each of your dependents. A dependent is either your child or a relative that meets certain tests. You can’t claim your spouse as a dependent. You must list the Social Security number of each dependent you claim. See IRS Publication 501, Exemptions, Standard Deduction, and Filing Information, for rules that apply to people who don’t have an SSN.

4. Some people don’t qualify. You generally may not claim married persons as dependents if they file a joint return with their spouse. There are some exceptions to this rule.

5. Dependents may have to file. People that you can claim as your dependent may have to file their own federal tax return. This depends on many things, including the amount of their income, their marital status and if they owe certain taxes.

6. No exemption on dependent’s return. If you can claim a person as a dependent, that person can’t claim a personal exemption on his or her own tax return. This is true even if you don’t actually claim that person as a dependent on your tax return. The rule applies because you have to right to claim that person.

7. Exemption phase-­out. The $3,900 per exemption is subject to income limits. This rule may reduce or eliminate the amount depending on your income. See Publication 501 for details.

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You may face higher taxes this year

Posted by Sanket Shah | General | Friday 19 May 2017 2:41 pm

Some people filing their 2013 US tax returns are probably in for a nasty surprise. Here are some tax changes that could have a significant impact on what you will owe when you file your 2013 tax return:

Phase-­out of the personal and dependent exemptions:

Starting with 2013 tax returns, more folks will see a reduction in the personal and dependent exemptions they could claim in past years. Taxpayers with Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) levels of $250,000 for singles, $300,000 for married, $275,000 for head of household and married filing separately of $150,000, will see the loss of some or all of their previously allowed personal and dependent exemption deductions.

That means a couple with two dependent children with AGI over $500,000 could pay an additional tax of $6,200, or more.

Higher tax rates for long-­term capital gains and dividend income:

For people in the higher­-income groups below, the rate on capital gains and dividend income increases from 15 percent to 20.

A married taxpayer with a taxable income of $500,000, along with $30,000 in capital gains and $30,000 in dividend income, would pay an additional $3,000 of income tax.

Phase­-out of itemized deductions:

Taxpayers with higher incomes will also lose a portion of the deductions they claim for things like mortgage interest, real estate taxes and charitable gifts. Taxpayers with the same AGI levels as above — singles at $250,000, married jointly at $300,000, head of household at $275,000 and marries filing separately at $150,000 — will see their deductions reduced by an amount equal to 3 percent of their adjusted gross income that is above these thresholds. This can wipe out up to 80 percent of the deductions some taxpayers would have been allowed to claim in 2012.

A couple with about $40,000 in itemized deductions with AGI about $500,000 could pay an additional tax of $2,376.

Higher tax rates on ordinary taxable income:

For workers with higher incomes, the higher tax rate of 39.6 percent will replace the 35 percent rate. That new higher rate applies to single filers with taxable income above $400,000; married filers with income over $450,000; married filing separately over $225,000; and heads of household with taxable income over $425,000.

For instance, due to this tax hike a married couple with a taxable income of $500,000 will owe an additional $2,300.

Medicare surtax on self-­employment income:

Beginning in 2013, an additional 0.9 percent was levied on people whose combined salary and income from self-employment is above $200,000 for singles and $250,000 for married. This was another tax increase aimed at raising revenue to offset the cost of the new health care laws.

If you are married, and have net income from self-employment of $500,000 in 2013, this additional tax will cost you $2,250 this year.

Medicare surtax on investment income:

A part of Obamacare, this tax is designed to raise federal revenue to offset the cost of things like the government subsidies provided to lower income people who buy health insurance on the new health exchanges.

The Medicare surtax amounts to an additional 3.8 percent on net investment income (Like interest, dividends, tax exempt bond interest, royalties, rents, capital gains, etc.). This tax applies to taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income that exceeds $250,000 for married filers and $200,000 for singles. In total, high­income people must pay a tax rate of 23.8 percent on capital gains and dividends.

So for the married taxpayer mentioned above — with $20,000 in capital gains, $20,000 in dividend income and $10,000 in interest — would pay an additional $1,900 of income tax due to this change.

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Who Should File a 2012 Tax Return?

Posted by Sanket Shah | International Tax | Tuesday 29 January 2013 5:04 pm

If you received income during 2012, you may need to file a tax return in 2013. The amount of your income, your filing status, your age and the type of income you received will determine whether you’re required to file. Even if you are not required to file a tax return, you may still want to file. You may get a refund if you’ve had too much federal income tax withheld from your pay or qualify for certain tax credits.

Even if you’ve determined that you don’t need to file a tax return this year, you may still want to file. Here are five reasons why:

1. Federal Income Tax Withheld.  If your employer withheld federal income tax from your pay, if you made estimated tax payments, or if you had a prior year overpayment applied to this year’s tax, you could be due a refund.

2. Earned Income Tax Credit.  If you worked but earned less than $50,270 last year, you may qualify for EITC. EITC is a refundable tax credit; which means if you qualify you could receive EITC as a tax refund. Families with qualifying children may qualify to get up to $5,891 dollars.

3. Additional Child Tax Credit.  If you have at least one qualifying child and you don’t get the full amount of the Child Tax Credit, you may qualify for this additional refundable credit. You must file and use new Schedule 8812, Child Tax Credit, to claim the credit.

4. American Opportunity Credit.  If you or someone you support is a student, you might be eligible for this credit. Students in their first four years of postsecondary education may qualify for as much as $2,500 through this partially refundable credit. Even those who owe no tax can get up to $1,000 of the credit as cash back for each eligible student. You must file Form 8863, Education Credits, and submit it with your tax return to claim the credit.

5. Health Coverage Tax Credit.  If you’re receiving Trade Adjustment Assistance, Reemployment Trade Adjustment Assistance, Alternative Trade Adjustment Assistance or pension benefit payments from the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, you may be eligible for a 2012 Health Coverage Tax Credit. Spouses and dependents may also be eligible. If you’re eligible, you can receive a 72.5 percent tax credit on payments you made for qualified health insurance premiums.

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Who is required to file an US individual tax return

Posted by Sanket Shah | Newsletters | Thursday 26 July 2012 5:36 pm
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