Due date for filing your FinCen Form 114 (FBAR)

Posted by nsglobal | General | Monday 12 June 2017 1:29 pm

October 15. The new annual due date for filing Reports of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR) for foreign financial accounts is April 15.  This date change was mandated by the Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice Improvement Act of 2015, Public Law 114-41 (the Act).  Specifically, section 2006(b)(11) of the Act changes the FBAR due date to April 15 to coincide with the Federal income tax filing season.  The Act also mandates a maximum six-month extension of the filing deadline.  To implement the statute with minimal burden to the public and FinCEN, FinCEN will grant filers failing to meet the FBAR annual due date of April 15 an automatic extension to October 15 each year.  Accordingly, specific requests for this extension are not required.

https://www.fincen.gov/news/news-releases/new-due-date-fbars-0

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IRS Plans Jan. 30 Tax Season Opening For 1040 Filers

Posted by Sanket Shah | International Tax | Friday 11 January 2013 11:40 am

Following the January tax law changes made by Congress under the American Taxpayer Relief Act (ATRA), the Internal Revenue Service announced today it plans to open the 2013 filing season and begin processing individual income tax returns on Jan. 30.

The IRS will begin accepting tax returns on that date after updating forms and completing programming and testing of its processing systems. This will reflect the bulk of the late tax law changes enacted Jan. 2. The announcement means that the vast majority of tax filers — more than 120 million households — should be able to start filing tax returns starting Jan 30.

The IRS estimates that remaining households will be able to start filing in late February or into March because of the need for more extensive form and processing systems changes. This group includes people claiming residential energy credits, depreciation of property or general business credits. Most of those in this group file more complex tax returns and typically file closer to the April 15 deadline or obtain an extension.

“We have worked hard to open tax season as soon as possible,” IRS Acting Commissioner Steven T. Miller said. “This date ensures we have the time we need to update and test our processing systems.”

The IRS will not process paper tax returns before the anticipated Jan. 30 opening date. There is no advantage to filing on paper before the opening date, and taxpayers will receive their tax refunds much faster by using e-file with direct deposit.

“The best option for taxpayers is to file electronically,” Miller said.

The opening of the filing season follows passage by Congress of an extensive set of tax changes in ATRA on Jan. 1, 2013, with many affecting tax returns for 2012. ‬While the IRS worked to anticipate the late tax law changes as much as possible, the final law required that the IRS update forms and instructions as well as make critical processing system adjustments before it can begin accepting tax returns.
The IRS originally planned to open electronic filing this year on Jan. 22; more than 80 percent of taxpayers filed electronically last year.

Who Can File Starting Jan. 30?

The IRS anticipates that the vast majority of all taxpayers can file starting Jan. 30, regardless of whether they file electronically or on paper. The IRS will be able to accept tax returns affected by the late Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) patch as well as the three major “extender” provisions for people claiming the state and local sales tax deduction, higher education tuition and fees deduction and educator expenses deduction.

Who Can’t File Until Later?

There are several forms affected by the late legislation that require more extensive programming and testing of IRS systems. The IRS hopes to begin accepting tax returns including these tax forms between late February and into March; a specific date will be announced in the near future.
The key forms that require more extensive programming changes include Form 5695 (Residential Energy Credits), Form 4562 (Depreciation and Amortization) and Form 3800 (General Business Credit). A full listing of the forms that won’t be accepted until later is available on IRS.gov.

As part of this effort, the IRS will be working closely with the tax software industry and tax professional community to minimize delays and ensure as smooth a tax season as possible under the circumstances.

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Form 8938

Posted by Sanket Shah | General | Wednesday 1 February 2012 12:01 pm

 

For tax years beginning after March 18, 2010, certain individuals must file new Form 8938 to report the ownership of specified foreign financial assets if the total value of those assets exceeds the reporting threshold amount.

Who Must File: Unless an exception applies, you must file Form 8938 if you are a specified person that has an interest in specified foreign financial assets and the value of those assets is more than the applicable reporting threshold.

Exception: If you do not have to file an income tax return for the tax year, you do not have to file Form 8938, even if the value of your specified foreign financial assets is more than the appropriate reporting threshold.

Specified individual: You are a specified individual if you are one of the following:

1. A U.S. citizen

2. A resident alien of the United States for any part of the tax year

3. A nonresident alien who makes an election to be treated as a resident alien for purposes of filing a joint income tax return

Specified foreign financial assets: Generally include the following assets:

1. Any financial account maintained by a foreign financial institution.

2. To the extent held for investment and not held in a financial account, any stock or securities issued by someone that is not a U.S. person, any interest in a foreign entity, and any financial instrument or contract with an issuer or counterparty that is not a U.S. person.

Reporting threshold: If the total value of your specified financial assets is more than the following:

Taxpayer living in United States

Taxpayer living abroad

On the last day of the tax year

Anytime during the tax year

On the last day of the tax year

Anytime during the tax year

Unmarried $50,000 $75,000 $200,000 $300,000
Married filing jointly $100,000 $150,000 $400,000 $600,000
Married filing separately $50,000 $75,000 $200,000 $300,000

Form 8938 does not relieve you of the requirement to file FBAR form TD F 90-22.1

 

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