IRS will soon examine U.S. taxpayers with undeclared Indian bank accounts.

Posted by Sanket Shah | General | Friday 19 May 2017 2:38 pm

Reporting on a California State Bar Tax Section Meeting, Tax Notes reports that the IRS will soon (as early as the week of 11/11/13) ) begin examining U.S. taxpayers suspected of holding undeclared accounts in Indian banks, according to Nicholas Connors, a supervisory revenue agent with SEP.

Read the full Tax Notes here.

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Ten Facts about Capital Gains and Losses

Posted by Sanket Shah | General | Friday 19 May 2017 2:27 pm

When you sell a ‘capital asset’, the sale usually results in a capital gain or loss. A ‘capital asset’ includes most property you own and use for personal or investment purposes. Here are 10 facts from the IRS on capital gains and losses:

1. Capital assets include property such as your home or car. They also include investment property such as stocks and bonds.

2. A capital gain or loss is the difference between your basis and the amount you get when you sell an asset. Your basis is usually what you paid for the asset.

3. You must include all capital gains in your income. Beginning in 2013, you may be subject to the Net Investment Income Tax. The NIIT applies at a rate of 3.8% to certain net investment income of individuals, estates, and trusts that have income above statutory threshold amounts.

4. You can deduct capital losses on the sale of investment property. You can’t deduct losses on the sale of personal-­use property.

5. Capital gains and losses are either long-­term or short­-term, depending on how long you held the property. If you held the property for more than one year, your gain or loss is long­-term. If you held it one year or less, the gain or loss is short-­term.

6. If your long­-term gains are more than your long­-term losses, the difference between the two is a net long­-term capital gain. If your net long-­term capital gain is more than your net short­-term capital loss, you have a ‘net capital gain.’

7. The tax rates that apply to net capital gains will usually depend on your income. For lower-­income individuals, the rate may be zero percent on some or all of their net capital gains. In 2013, the maximum net capital gain tax rate increased from 15 to 20 percent. A 25 or 28 percent tax rate can also apply to special types of net capital gains.

8. If your capital losses are more than your capital gains, you can deduct the difference as a loss on your tax return. This loss is limited to $3,000 per year, or $1,500 if you are married and file a separate return.

9. If your total net capital loss is more than the limit you can deduct, you can carry over the losses you are not able to deduct to next year’s tax return. You will treat those losses as if they happened that year.

10. You must file Form 8949, Sales and Other Dispositions of Capital Assets, with your federal tax return to report your gains and losses. You also need to file Schedule D, Capital Gains and Losses with your return.

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Surrendering Green Card – New Form I­-407

Posted by Sanket Shah | General | Friday 19 May 2017 12:57 pm

In February 2015, the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services issued a new Form I­-407 for the abandonment of an individual’s United States green card (technically, “lawful permanent resident” status).

The new Form I­-407 now provides a separate section to obtain the consent of parents of minors who relinquish the green card. As in the old form, the new form asks for reasons for abandonment of the green card, but this question now appears to be more formally presented and appears to require a more detailed statement.

Giving It Up: No Fee — Yet!

Green card holders are taxed in the same manner as US citizens: they are both subject to US income tax on their worldwide income regardless of the source of that income and regardless of where the green card holder or citizen is living at the time it is earned. However, they are not treated exactly the same when it comes to relinquishing their US status. The US citizen who renounces his US citizenship, must now pay a fee of $2,350 for the privilege of doing so. On the other hand, there is still no fee for relinquishing one’s green card.

Internal Revenue Service is Notified When You Give Up the Green Card

Interestingly, the instructions to the new Form I-­407 specifically advise applicants that: “The Department of Homeland Security is required to provide the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) with the names of individuals who choose to abandon their LPR status. If you file this form with us, we will provide only your name and the filing date to the IRS. (Internal Revenue Code section 6039G(d)(3))”.

Dire consequences can result if an individual does not properly relinquish his green card and file all required paperwork with the IRS.

Please note, that simply because the green card has expired for immigration law purposes, it does not likewise “expired” for US income tax purposes thereby relieving them of the duty to pay US taxes.

Your Name May Appear On the “Name and Shame” List

Code Section 6039G implements the so­-called “Name and Shame” list. This is a quarterly publication in the Federal Register by the IRS listing the names of individuals about whom the IRS has received information of a loss of citizenship during the preceding quarter. This list is required to include the names not only of former U.S. citizens but of certain former green card holders. Under 26 U.S.C. § 6039G(d) (3), “the Federal agency primarily responsible for administering the immigration laws shall provide to the Secretary the name of each lawful permanent resident of the United States (within the meaning of section 7701 (b)(6)) whose status as such has been revoked or has been administratively or judicially determined to have been abandoned.”

The Federal Register provides that “for purposes of this listing, long­term residents, as defined in section 877(e)(2), are treated as if they were citizens of the United States who lost citizenship”. So, if you’ve held your green card for at least 8 of the preceding 15 tax years, your name will appear on the “Name and Shame” list when you return the card.

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US income tax provision on foreign currency gain or loss

Posted by Sanket Shah | General | Wednesday 30 May 2012 4:49 pm

Many of my friends called me last week from US and told me that many Indian banks were calling and suggesting them to transfer US dollars to India due to an all time high rate of Rupees 56 to a dollar.

(more…)

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